Huff Post: Home Health Aides Must Adapt for Dimensia Care

The training and responsibilities of home care professionals are seeing a massive shift in light of a widespread Alzheimer’s “epidemic” that affects an estimated 5.4 million Americans, writes a Huffington Post column published this week. With home care patients increasingly needing help with different types of services due to the disease, caregivers have had to adapt and adjust. Above all, they have had to become more patient. 

The Huffington Post columnist, Marki Flannery, president of Partners in Care writes: 

The vast majority of care provided at home is delivered by family caregivers, with less than 10 percent of adults receiving all their care from paid workers. Since people with dementia, especially when it is severe, can require round-the-clock care, a network of caregivers is sometimes required and can include a combination of professional and family caregivers. For more on determining when a loved one might need more help than you alone can provide, see the Alzheimer’s Associations primer of when and how to ask for help.

Specialized care is central to today’s home health care landscape, and I have been following it over several posts (including caring for someone with multiple sclerosis and with diabetes). Home health care, after all, is not a one-size-fits-all profession. When you or a loved one choose certified home care from a licensed agency, you have the advantage of matching a caregiver’s experience, expertise or training to your loved one’s specific care needs, including dementia. In addition, certified home health aides are often part of a larger team, responsible for day-to-day implementation of doctor’s orders and a nurse’s plan of care.

Read the original column

Written by Elizabeth Ecker

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