New York Times: Health Care on the Go? There’s An App For That

Ranging from real-time emergency center locators to alerts that remind patients when to take their meds, apps are making a major entry into the market for mobile health care. The number of apps for mobile devices such as the iPhone that aim to make remote health care possible are quickly growing, writes a New York Times article published June 11.

While the article focuses on the use of mobile medical apps as an aid to travelers, the apps can be used by anyone who has a supporting mobile device. Home health patients and their caregivers can utilize the apps to record and store medical history and identify medication. Apps can also be used as a reminder of when to take medications.

The New York Times reports:

Travelers with chronic ailments like diabetes or high blood pressure have long struggled to remember when to take their pills as they cross time zones. Or they may have had a hard time finding emergency care in a foreign country or communicating about complicated health conditions.

Those who have had cardiac or other surgery may create a simple image using the free app drawMD for iPad devices that shows the exact location of a stent, for example, or an implant or bypass.

The Emergency Medical Center Locator, a free iPhone app, uses the phone’s GPS to find nearby centers. The app lists nearly 2,400 medical centers in 101 countries, and users can select from six specialty areas, including trauma, eye and cardiac care. While not every medical center is listed, the ones that are have been approved by credentialing societies like the American College of Cardiology.

Time zone changes can be extra challenging for patients, like those with diabetes, with a 24-hour monitoring schedule. Phone apps like Glucose Buddy and GluCoMo remind users to track and record their blood sugar levels.

 Read the full article.

Written by Erin Hegarty

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