USA Today Highlights Best New Tech for Aging in Place

With the desire to age in place representing a common thread among many older adults, technologies that accommodates this whim continue to have a seat at the table when it comes to helping seniors remain independent at home, according to USA Today.

It’s no surprise that an overwhelming majority of seniors want to live out the remainder of their lives within the comforts of their own homes, according to an AARP survey cited by USA Today, which reported 95% of adults age 75 and older expressing this sentiment.

Technology can accommodate these preferences, the article suggests, as newer products are developed to assist seniors in remaining independent at home, while also providing peace of mind to their adult children in letting them know their aging parent is safe.

Lively, a sensor-based activity tracking system, is just one tech product that can help keep an unobtrusive eye on loved ones. Attaching the technology’s suite of sensors on a person’s commonly used everyday items, such as a bedroom door or medicine cabinet, allows friends or family from “half a world away” to observe the daily activities of an individual. 

The Lively system tracks a person’s routine, generating reports in real time via the Internet or a smartphone app that alerts when something seems out of the ordinary. The system utilizes a cellular network to really information, so a Wi-Fi connection is not necessary in order for the tech to work.

For seniors still living at home, household chores can require an extra degree of difficulty than they once did. This is where the Moneual Rydis H68 Hybrid robotic vacuum comes in handy. 

Similar to a Roomba, the vacuum from Moneual Rydis cleans not only carpets and hard floors, but is also able to learn the best paths for each room it tackles. When its battery is running low, the device even docks itself when it’s low on power. 

Other top tech for helping older adults age in place include senior-friendly smartphones, GPS-equipped shoes, medication monitoring and reminding devices, as well as a hearing aid that allows its wearer to stream phone calls directly to the device from an iPhone.

Read more at USA Today

Written by Jason Oliva