Home Care Companies Top Best Franchise List

Home care companies were once again named top franchise investment choices by Forbes, underscoring the strong demographics for the industry.

Franchising offers the opportunity to e an entrepreneur without needing a big, original idea. For those looking to jump into the franchise space, a few strong brands within home care are among the winners, according to Forbes, which created the list of best and worst franchises from rankings by research firm FRANdata.

Four home care companies made the best list, which was listed according to the price of admission for opening a franchise branch.

Right at Home, which offers in-home care and had 433 units in 2015, was ranked the No. 1 “Top Franchise to Buy” within the lowest investment segment—under $150,000—as listed by Forbes. The Omaha, Nebraska-based company has been rapidly expanding throughout 2016, including adding 7,000 caregivers to its network and opening 14 new franchise units in the first quarter of the year. The company has been ranked a top franchise to buy by Forbes the previous two years, when the listing was first established.

One of the biggest national chains, Comfort Keepers, also made the list, ranking as the 7th top franchise to buy in the same investment category. The company, which reported 669 units in 2015, has also consistently been named one of the best home care franchise over the past few years and experienced significant growth since 2010. Comfort Keepers provides in-home care, respite care, end-of-life care, Alzheimer’s and dementia care, private duty nursing, senior care and transitioning home services.

National franchising company BrightStar Care, which has been on the front lines of a minimum wage law in Seattle, was ranked No. 9 on the best list. The home care and home health agency has 293 units in 2015, and offers companion care, personal care, skilled home care, Alzheimer’s and dementia care, senior transportation and child care. The company also offers some medical staffing services.

Rounding out the list was Seniors Helping Seniors, a company that provides non-medical, in-home services delivered by other seniors. The company, which was started in 1998, matches seniors who want to provide care to seniors who are in need of help.

Written by Amy Baxter