Michigan Pushes for Senior In-Home Care Funding Boost

A Michigan proposal currently seeking federal approval would aid in improving home-care options for seniors, and potentially saving tens of thousands of dollars per patient, according to a Detroit News article. Currently seeking public comment, the proposal is supported by AARP and aims to help save in spending for those who qualify for both Medicare and Medicaid.

The Detroit News reports:

The Department of Community Health is finalizing a proposal that would better coordinate care by determining whether individuals need skilled nursing in a 24-hour facility or can live independently at home with the assistance of daytime aides, officials said.

A comment period on the proposal ended Wednesday, a day before the American Association of Retired Persons called on policymakers to spend more on in-home health care and less on institutional nursing homes.

Thirty-five states spend fewer tax dollars on Medicaid for nursing home care than Michigan, in part because of policies that put a greater emphasis on home or community-based medical care, according to a new AARP Michigan report.

One study estimates Michigan could save more than $57,000 per patient with home-based health care. In 2011, $80,300 was the median annual rate for a semi-private room in a Michigan nursing home, according to AARP.

“This is no longer something where people just speculate: ‘Is this the right thing to do,'” said Lisa Dedden Cooper, advocacy manager for AARP Michigan.

Read the original article.

Written by Elizabeth Ecker

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Elizabeth Ecker
Director of Content at Home Health Care News
Curious about all things, when not writing about senior housing topics, Liz is an avid explorer of food. She loves trying new recipes, new restaurants and new ice cream flavors. (Current favorite: Goat cheese with red cherries.)

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