Forbes: 5 Senior Care Technologies Worth Trying

New technology solutions show promise in helping seniors stay at home, with focuses on therapy, socialization and monitoring programs.

One tool has even been proven to reduce the need for anxiety medications by 30%, according to a recent Forbes article.

This tool, called Paro, is a $6,000 therapeutic robot seal that gives seniors a chance to care for it, helping reduce bouts of anxiety and wandering. The seal’s creator, Takanori Shibata, is now offering a lease-to-own program with maintenance support to spread Paro’s presence in the U.S.

“The effect was pretty immediate; they would pet the device and calm down,” says Davis Park, director of The Front Porch Center for Innovation and Wellbeing, in the Forbes article.

To help ensure that anxiety medications — and others — are taken, families and caregivers can use Lively, a home center monitoring program that keeps track of a patient’s actions. Sensors attached to a pill box, a fridge or a key connect to a hub that relays information to those responsible for the senior’s wellbeing.

Another tech tool, called Dakim BrainFitness, helps with engagement and memory. The online brain training program, disguised as computer games, exercises six cognitive domains: long-term memory, short-term memory, language, computation, visuospatial orientation and executive function.

Two other tech tools promote socialization among seniors, and help them remain connected with friends and family. Tapestry is a networking platform for seniors, which allows exchanging of photos and messages using iPads or iPhones.

Tapestry is rolling out another tool, called Stitch, which is a “dating service for friendships,” the Forbes article says. The online companionship site searches for people with similar interests who live in the area and lets seniors connect privately.

These five tools, Forbes writes, could help individuals keen on staying put at home.

To read the full article, click here.

Written by Emily Study